Ours2share's Blog

Hazelwood and Churchill (Victoria, Australia) local Girl Guide information noticeboard.

Australia Day … Yes I’m Cool.

Australia Day 2009 [written by one of the Youth Guides]

On the 26th of January 2009 Churchill and Hazelwood Guides made their way over to the Churchill community hall, to start the Australia Day ceremony. We started the ceremony with the colour party coming forward, this year I got out of colour party and instead I took some magnificent photos. The colour party then had to raise the flag (Although they only had to do was pull a string to release the flag). After the flag got put up we sang the Australian National Anthem.

May 4, 2010 Posted by | Australia Day, Austrralia Day 2009, Take part in, Uncategorized, Write | , | 3 Comments

Balloon basket ball

Balloon basket ball is a noisy fun game.

Two equal teams are formed.  The balloon is trown in the middle and players try to hit the balloon to their own goal.

This might be a player standing on a chair  or a piece of newspaper holding a pin!.

To score gaoler must pop balloon without getting off the chair or out of the square newspaper area.

April 24, 2010 Posted by | Air, Best, Challenge, Demonstrate, Enjoy, Fun, Girls, hand, Illustrate, Plan and Lead, play, Take part in, Uncategorized | , , | 2 Comments

Give it a Whirl

This is actually a fun whirly glider thing to make.  originally it came from a Guiding Australia magazine as guides through out Australia were being encouraged to fund raise for a bus so that the Kiribati Guides had transport..

April 24, 2010 Posted by | Air, Construct, Create, Demonstrate, Discover, Explore, Find-out-about, Girls, hand, Service, Take part in, Uncategorized, water | , , | Leave a comment

Creating a front garden at the Hazelwood South Hall

The Hazelwood South Hall entrance looks uncared for. So what if we all spend a little time sprucing this area up?

A Saturday has been put aside so that the tan bark that has been donated for the Hall use combined with some of the bricks from the back of the Hall used as an edging for two little gardens can be created.

So how about making this a District family event occurring on the 3rd of April 2010.

Venue – Hazelwood South Hall, 762 Tramway Road Churchill Victoria 3842

Start time 9 oclock – finish at lunch time.  Your family will need tools like wheel barrows, gloves, shovels, buckets and garden forks.

April 23, 2010 Posted by | April, bricks, Build, Construct, Garden, Lend-a-hand, Recylcle, Take part in, team member | , , , | 3 Comments

Living a Healthy Active Lifestyle

In the Centenary Challenge Badge there is a light blue section that requires a new physical skill  that some of the Guide participated in was a Night Penny Hike.

The  instructions  given included road sense, tossing the coin, walking together, using a torch..

Since most of the guides participating were not comfortable with walking through parks, near roads, and across traffic during the dark hours this night penny hike was a challenge.  Although not totally enjoying the Dark the Guides are a little more comfortable when walking in a group at night.

Other active games played with friends have been the water game, soccer, making bubbles.

April 22, 2010 Posted by | Create, Elements of Guiding Program, Explore, Lead, Outdoors [and the environment], Prepare, Take part in | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Reading about the influence of Girl Guide movement

Once upon a time in a far off land lived five little girls. One girl was a Moslem, another was Buddhist, the third was Jewish, the fourth a Christian and the fifth was a Hindu. The girls were friends but they had to meet in secret because their fami­lies distrusted people who had cus­toms different from their own. Their families did not really understand that the girls liked each other and wanted to be friends.

One day news came about an elderly man in a far off country who had started something called Girl Guides, and now a unit was starting in their area. The five girls were very excited because they were able to join Brownie Guides together. They, like guides all over the world today, had different religions and beliefs but were able to meet together in friendship because all Guides existed happily together. -Their families were happy to see the girls together in Guiding because it was a good thing.

As the years passed the girls grew up and were young women when war came to their land. They were very afraid because people with dif­ferent beliefs were fighting with each other. Our five Guides were very troubled until one of them said “We are different but we are the same. We are sister Guides and we always help one another in times of need.”

And so, our five young women and their families promoted peace in their land and grew to understand and accept each others customs.

The five young girls in this story now have children of their own. Their children play together happily today, all because the Girl Guides came to their land a long time ago.

The white corner on our World Flag shows our commitment to world peace.

GiA P 22  October 1994

April 22, 2010 Posted by | Advocacy, Girl-Power, Girls, Governance, Guiding-Traditions, identity, Lord Baden- Powell, responsibilities, World Guide Flag | , , | 3 Comments

Olave Baden-Powell Game

The Girls choose a place in the meeting area.   Each Guide is given a word and an action that they will complete on hearing that word.  The Article following is read out with the chosen actions and noises are made.

Note in a flexiable aged meeting time the older guides can buddy with with the Younger Guides.  For a great effect try to alter the partners so that one time they are scattered other times playing the game they are partnered together.

OLAVE : The Clipping of Gernaniums on the Palace Roof top.  Sound: Clip, Clip clip

ROBERT : riding a horse   Sound Clip clop, clip clop.

Lady Baden-Powell : A Guide Salute (pointing verticle)

Lord Baden-Powell : A Scout Salute. (pointing towards the head)

Girl Guide or Girl Scout and WAGGGS : In the air draw the Trefoil Symbol

Movement : Flag flying Sound : gentle wind rustling the flying World Flag into action.

World:  Everyone try and place their left hand together in the center of a circle formation.

OLAVE BADEN-POWELL

A Great Lady — Our Great Inspiration

The World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) grew up from its infancy under the care, commitment and tireless leadership of Olave, Lady Baden-Powell. Few organisations as large have been so united in their respect and love for their leader — but then few have been lucky enough to have a leader like ‘Lady B.-P.’, as she was affectionately called.

A Sheltered life

Robert Baden-Powell married Olave St Clair Soames in 1912.

Robert had an active and successful army career, and had travelled exten­sively.

Olave, at 23, had led what she later described as a happy, shel­tered but completely useless life. It was the beginning of a career in which Olave would become known as the world’s most travelled woman.

The couple made their home at Pax Hill, Hampshire, England. The house soon became a meeting place for members and supporters of the two Movements founded by Lord Baden-Powell.

At Pax Hill, even while raising a family, Lady Baden-Powell took a keen interest in her husband’s work and accompanied him on many visits. After the birth of their third child in 1917 Olave became officially involved with the Girl Guides. Olaves involvement began in England, but with the Movement spreading at a tremen­dous rate across the world, she was soon to become an international figure, inspiring enthusiasm and affection wherever she went.

Husband and wife team

After forming the International Council in 1919, Lady Baden-Powell’s life became packed with activity, travelling and speaking to members all over the world. Lord Baden-Powell was of course doing exactly the same with the Scout Movement, and this famous hus­band and wife team worked together during the period which Olave later recalled as a very memor­able one … ‘the late ’20s and the early ’30s really saw us reach the peak of work together as husband and wife in the service of our brother and sister Movements.’

World Chief Guide

In 1930, the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts unanimously voted Lady Baden-Powell World Chief Guide. Olave continued to devote her seemingly endless energy to promoting the interests of girls all round the world, even though sadly in 1941 Olave lost her husband.

Rare honours for a rare lady

In a gruelling schedule which most would have found physically impossible to sustain, Lady Baden-Powell visited 111 countries in all — many on several occasions — and flew over half a million miles. olave made hundreds of thousands of platform appearances and she broadcast or appeared on tele­vision in every country she visited.

Wherever she went, Lady Baden-Powell was given a reception which testified to the respect and affec­tion in which she was held. Olave was made a Dame Grand Cross by her own country. Olave was given the freedom of cities the world over, and rare honours were bestowed on her by heads of state. These honors include such glittering awards as the Orders of The Sun of Peru, The White Rose of Finland, The Ducal Crown of Oaks of Luxembourg, The Silver Phoenix of Greece, The Sacred Treasure of Japan and The Silver Lion of Kenya. Her last inter­national award came from the United Nations (FAO), which gave her the Ceres medal in recognition of the world-wide services carried out by the Girl Guide and Girl Scout Movement under her leadership.

The will to cherish an ideal

Travel had to cease when in 1970 she was found to be suffering dia­betes. Although she then had to fol­low a strict regime, Olave never ceased to inspire and strengthen WAGGGS. People came to her now. from all countries, old friends, strangers, of all ages and nationalities. Letters poured in” each day — and each one was answered with an encouraging reply.

Olave, Lady Baden-Powell died in 1977 at 88 years of age, but the memory of her life and personality continues to inspire the millions of hearts and minds which make up the Girl Guide and Girl Scout Movement. The following words, written shortly after her death, best convey the lasting gift she brought us: Her great and lasting achieve­ment was to give to the young people with whom she came into contact the will to cherish an ideal and the courage and determination to seek to fulfil it.

Every girl guide and girl scout
seeking the true meaning of the
threefold Promise needs to look no
further than Olave Baden-Powell.
In every sense she kept her Promise.


Altered slightly from Guiding in Australia, December 1988                  3

April 22, 2010 Posted by | 100 Years of Guiding, Find-out-about, Lord Baden- Powell, Lord Baden-Powell, play, WAGGGS, World Flag | , , | 2 Comments

The color path through the Centenary challenge

The Guides decided that they would tackle the challenges offered in the Centenary Challenge in the following order:

Dark Blue – Knowing our Beginning

Dark Pink – Learning about our WAGGGS family.

Purple – Looking after our World.

Light Blue – Living a healthy active lifestyle.

Light Green – Learning Guiding Skills.

Pale Pink – Appreciating the Australian identity

Dark Green – Sharing skills with others.

Orange – Understanding others.

Yellow – Understanding myself

April 22, 2010 Posted by | 100 Years of Guiding, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program | , | 6 Comments

Delegation and Leadership learned through the making of paper cups

The making of paper cups is an activity that may be done in Patrols following patrol structure or as a meeting group that allows a freer flow of skill sharing – especially in a flexible age group meeting time.  The making of the cup activity is one that as many Guides can participate in as are there. We have made these paper cups at the tables in the patrols corner or scattered around the floor – depending on the numbers of Guides making them.

The adult Leader installs in the Guides that “no job is finished until all have finished the activity”.  Using the  rational in your own leadership provideds a control factor necessary in balancing both the program and the skills that are learned.  Making the cup is only one skill of many -patience, Leadership, self activement, comanionship, mateship being only some skills learned.

Understandably some of the  Guides with more dexterity in there fingers finish quickly.  These Guides are expected to assist  by showing with another piece of paper [ thus making another cup] not by taking over another Guides learning of how to make her own cup.  This showing rather than doing for someone -usually because the doer is impatient for the next step is part of responsible delegation.  As once the second Guide learns how there are now two Guides looking out to assist someone.  The one with the newer skill may need to still be over seen by the nor experienced one.  This is leadership training through making a paper cup.

Guiding provides so many ways of learning and absorbing leadership at all the levels through out the Members. Many activities link into another activity. Put together, the activities are then part of the program structure.  Which in turn is just part of an overall objective.

In this case bubble mix was made then bubbles were created,  next paper cups were made, a water game was played, And the Guides discussed when they were going to go swimming at the pool.  Sounds simple and straight forward.  What was also shown was leadership skills, creating of activities from what was on hand, resourcefulness, resilience, governance, having voice, objectives, participation, interacting with different ages, people recognition, hosting, welcoming, acceptance, self esteem, fun, ownership, laughter, appreciation and being accepted for who and what each of us are, not for what we have.

More importantly that fear of the unknown is one of peoples greatest ‘walls’ that stop them from challenging themselves.  Guiding may provide the start to demolishing these walls.

April 21, 2010 Posted by | Empowerment, Lend-a-hand, People, Self | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Upgrading the Hazelwood and Churchill Guide District

Standards and technology has changed many methods of ‘doing things’.  The old attitude of just getting in there and doing ‘it’ can not meet the current demands that fall on the Hazelwood and Churchill Guide District, the stakeholders and others that Guiding as a whole, touches through it’s Guiding presence.

Sounds terrific but what does this mean?

Simply put.  Old methods have had to leave, die out and generally be replaced.  New standards have been introduced and are being accepted.  The recognition that the new standards are multitasked and far reaching had to develop, and be implemented through new structure, understanding and demonstrations.  Once the District and those within started to follow these standard requirements there appeared so much to do to catch up.

A needs analysis was completed thus the main areas of concern were noted.  Available for viewing people were surveyed as to what to do about the main points.

  1. The District needed to come forward into the 21st  Century. Being informed and developing a shared management knowledge basis common to all levels and understood and used by all within the Hazelwood and Churchill District.  The challenge has taken time, is still developing,  growing and being learned and supported by all members within the District. From the five year olds to the day we are no longer recycled!
  2. Communication and information was a challenge as often time constraints for parents and careers meant that activities, event, service and camp information just was not getting through. Hence information is gradually being placed onto this “ours2share.wordpress.com site, and is being posted on Facebook, twitter and yahoo [although twitter is still a challenge]
  3. Youth membership had gradually dwindled.  Leaders either retired or moved on. The responses to these challenges were simply to build the Guides self respect and resilience of themselves and what they were doing to levels that were reinforced and self fulfilling, to encourage negative influences to leave the District and Youth movement, to reinstate the Olave program and provide a continuous flow of age groups. To then find new leaders potential.
  4. Where the District and Youth members met had various challenges. So the venue was changed back to the the old Glendonald Maternal and Child Health Clinic building Churinga Drive, Glendonald.
  5. Occupational Health and Safety were of  paramount importance. Has lead to extending trainings as well as the creation a safe united muti-aged untied front.
  6. The public had been told that the Hazelwood and Churchill District was no longer functioning. Increasing our profile, including others and getting actively involved in the community has assisted and is growing.  The input is really beginning to make a difference in all the Guiding aspects.  Not having a very large public persona, having a low ‘man power’ base to call on for maintenance of our assets, while being unable to use our traditional meeting place of over fifty years was unintentionally back this public perception up.
  7. Isolation issues from the public and the other Units within the Region. Lack of parental transport has long been an issue.  Glendonald Maternal and child Health Center building is on the bus route.  So meetings are timed around the transport home. The idea that the early aged meeting times the guides and their parents are able to walk and be dropped off then the parent may catch the bus back around Churchill.- or become a Unit helper etc.
  8. Negative slanderous comments just would not go away.  For over twenty years [that I know of] different families involved in different organisations believed they had to much to gain to stop. So it was decided to make no response to these comments.  Once people had a chance to recognize just what it was Guiding was all about, what Guiding offered and just how inclusive and developmental guiding actually was our membership statics would be better.  the tide is turning slowly.  This chance had to be made to happen.
  9. Was the program actually meeting the needs of the members. A telling statement.  But was what was offered actually what was needed.  How did we bring through leadership, Patrol traditions, service, governance, ownership and so forth.

April 19, 2010 Posted by | Knowledge management, Network, Qualifications, responsibility, Risk Annalysis, self, Service, what do Guides Do? | , , , | 4 Comments