Ours2share's Blog

Hazelwood and Churchill (Victoria, Australia) local Girl Guide information noticeboard.

SCONES


NUMBER:   12                                                                      OVEN TEMP:   220ºC

COOKING TIME:   10 -15 MINUTES

INGREDIENTS:

2 CUPS SELF RAISING FLOUR                                      1 TEASPOON SALT

1 TABLESPOON B UTTER                                              ¾ CUP MILK

METHOD:

COLLECT INGREDIENTS

RUB BUTTER INTO FLOUR AND SALT USING FINGERTIPS

MIX INTO A SOFT DOUGH WITH MILK. ADD LITTLE ADDIONAL MILK IF REQUIRED

TURN ON TO A LIGHTLY FLOURED BOARD AND KNEAD DOUGH UNTIL SMOTH AND ELASTIC

ROLL OUT 2 CENTREMETRES THICK AND CUT INTO SHAPES USING A CUTTER OR KNIFE

ARRANGE ON OVEN TRAY AND GLAZE TOPS WITH MILK

PLACE ON OVEN TRAY ABOVE THE CENTRE  OF OVEN AND BAKE UNTIL GOLDEN BROWN.

TO TEST -THE SIDES OF SCONE SHOULD BE SET

LIFT ONTO CAKE COOLER

WHEN COOL BREAK IN HALF AND BUTTER LIGHTLY

Forwarded by Narrida who is making these Scones for the Hazelwood andChurchill District Guide Team Morning Tea in May 2010.

May 2, 2010 Posted by | Adult members, body, cook, Entertain, Estimate, Food, foods we like, friendship, girl, hand, Prepare, Sub Committees, Uncategorized | | 4 Comments

The basic Overhand knot.

To tie a rope in a long rope up into overhand fold the rope together until the rope is about a meter to a meter and a half in length. Now both ends are used to tie the folded rope up in a  over hand knot.

Overhand knots are used  when making a loop that will not slip as it is a difficult to loosen this knot once pulled tight. The Overhand knot is used .in the following:

  • Tying canvases or sheets down and holding an other knot in place ie by tying an overhand knot at the end of a rop, piece of string etc a second knot will have trouble slipping off the end of the rope,
  • Used also as tie holds on a climbing rope.
  • Used in beading and sewing to stop the beads coming off the twine or the sewing thread coming through what you are sewing.
  • Used to tie shoe laces up.
  • Used to tie two pieces of rope together …as in a fishermans knot [ aka a ‘kissing knot’].
  • Rescue work.
  • For joining two ends together

Once the overhand knot is learned, practiced and used the next step is on double overhand knot.

April 30, 2010 Posted by | Demonstrate, girl, hand, Learn, Plan and Lead, Rope, Uncategorized | , , | 2 Comments

The two really basic knots and a few challenges to face.

There are so many varieties of knots to learn how to tie, their names and what their uses are.  So when showing the younger Guides knots I show then two basic knots that they may be using anyway.  These being the half knot, stopper knot, overhand and the double over hand knot.

Most new Guides actually knot one or two knots.  What is not associated with this basic knowledge is the name, use and safety factors of the knots that they know.  Many times these Guides are scared of being considered ignorant. Left handers especially as they have tying difficulties. It is not realised that actuall rope twists are not meant to be loosened as a left hander will be doing if they tie the rope up in a way that makes left handed sense.  Because the traditional ropes instructions are set out for tying in a right hand fashion many of the instructions are still set out this way.

As a leader showing these basic ropes to learning Guides draw the instructions backwards and challenge your Guides to ties them with their other non dominant hand.  Your challenge may prepare them for tying ropes up when they are awkward positions, have an injury on their dominant hand.  Also the challenge brings everyone onto an open playing field.  One that has the left hander having an advantage in their life.

What most Guides really need reinforced is the care and storage of the ropes during and after any activity.

April 29, 2010 Posted by | body, Carry Out, Challenge, Demonstrate, Explore, friendship, girl, hand, Illustrate, Learn, Plan and Lead, Practice, Prepare, Rope, Show, Take part in, Uncategorized | , , , | 1 Comment

The Pioneer camp

By the time the Guides had finished practising the knots that they wanted to learn how to tie a great many had been left to learn at a later date.

The fact that the Guide were also organising a Pioneer camp should have warned the leaders what might have been forming in the Guides minds. You got it they were going to put their knots into practice and make an obsticale course while at camp. So a great deal of time was put aside learning the knots, whipping, splicing and other rope work involved in making gadgets, equipment and used in safety measures.

The Leaders paper work was up to date.The menu and rules had been created by the guides.  A Guides own organised, a campfire prepared, a night hike [complete with spooky animal noises and torches].  Camp duties and camp Patrols were up on the notice board. Along with the fire drills and emergency evacuation procedures.

As the pioneer camp drew nearer the equipment had to be sorted, the tents organised, along with the cooking equipment, Camp and Unit flags made. The World Guide Flag was packed to be taken as well. The program had been sorted out, transport arranged and food was purchased.  The camp site at Burnett Park was checked and where the camp would actually take place was arranged.  All was set.

There were a few surprises going to take place though.

April 29, 2010 Posted by | Build, Calculate, Care for, Check-out, clean, consider, Demonstrate, Develop, Discover, Discuss, Evacuation, Find out, First Aid, Food, friendship, girl, Hands, Investigate, knots, Nature, Plan and Lead, Practice, Prepare, Rope, Take part in, tent, Uncategorized, Unit Flags, World Flag | Leave a comment

The challenge of making a rope ladder out of all rope.

The Guides have made and experienced different rope ladders used either for crossing the water, going over the mud or swimming across something to get to the other side.  When Guides actually know their knots and the knots uses it is amazing what they can come up with to do.

At one stage the Guides used the following page from the ‘Ropes n’  Poles / ngataura me ngapou Guides New Zealand P 6’ in other pre-camp activities such as walking in the local bush, orienteering, Thinking Day , and the Lorraine Glazebrook Shield Challenge.

There were other rope ladder designs the Guides came across as well.  All various ladders were made and tried out.  Some were just ropes tossed over a branch and anchored around a lower tree branch and the trunk of the tree.  The dangling rope had half hitches going up it.  At first the Guides did not mind the swaying that occurred.  Then the higher up they went the more unsettled they each became.  There were a group of Guides holding the rope at the lower ends.

This method of stablizing the rope the Guides decided was not good as what happened if the branch was not safe and fell down on them all.

The next thing the Guides tried was tying the base of the knot to several different trees.  The ropes went out in different directions.  The Guides could still see the base of the dangling rope moving upward as the next guide tried to scale up the rope.

The final decision for this rope was that it would be good in an emergency or as a rope designed to have fun from over water.

The actual rope ladder that the Guides enjoyed most was one that had both wood and ‘thinish’ branches across as the rungs of the ladder.

April 29, 2010 Posted by | Demonstrate, Develop, Discover, Feet, girl, hand, Hands, Invent, Plan and Lead, Practice, Rope, Science-and-Technology, Take part in, tree, Uncategorized, Use | , , | 2 Comments

The Guides agree that their tummy goes funny when..

In an article published years ago through the  Guiding in Australia magazine the following concept was put forward.

“I know when I’m feeling unsafe. My palms go sweaty, my tummy feels funny and my knees go wobbly. I feel as though I want to go to the toilet. I say to myself, “I have a right to feel safe and be safe ALL the time.” Nothing is so awful that I can’t tell anyone about it.”

The Guides all agreed that there are times when this occurred to people.  These time included when there was a danger around while walking in the bush, or down a dark street or alley [cause the lights had been destroyed by people throwing rocks at the lights], when people called out rude word, names, and other abuse to them or their friends, When it was time to sit tests and exams, time to get up in front of a class and talk about something they had done or saw.

April 28, 2010 Posted by | body, Develop, Discover, Discuss, Explore, Extend, Get-in-touch, girl, Listen, play, Practice, Take part in, Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

Using the ‘My body belongs to me ‘ article.

Have the Guides sit in a circle so that they are comfortable. Explain to the Guides that a discussion about the safety of their own body will be following. Guides who feel uncomfortable are allowed to leave the circle and complete the other activities around the room.  This is an important step in allowing the Guides to feel safe.

Ask the Guides to write on a name tag their own first name.   Ask each Guide to say their own name. ..then to show their name tag.

My body belongs to (name)

With the following discussion topics each Guide is allowed not to talk about herself but to join in on a general line of thought.  We found that it had to be said in the beginning that the discussion could only be about themselves or in general [as in what was on the news, in the newspaper, and in magazines]as otherwise the discussion would be a ‘gossip’ time.

  • I have a right to feel safe ALL the time. If a bigger person is making me feel unsafe or is touching me in a way I don’t feel comfortable about I can say, “NO. Stop that”, even if the person is someone I know.
  • I don’t always have to do what a bigger person wants me to do! It’s okay to make a fuss.
  • I like feeling SAFE
  • I have the right to feel safe and be safe all the time.
  • My body belongs to me. No one has the right to touch me in ways that make me feel uncomfortable or unsafe.
  • Secrets that make me feel unsafe don’t have to be kept.
  • Nothing is so awful I can’t tell someone about it.

The discussion may not cover all topics above.  The answers may surprise you. There were some really positive aspects of the Guides thinking come out of this  discussion. We used this topic as a way of relating the Guides Promise and Law to each Guide growing stronger in their own understanding of themselves.

April 28, 2010 Posted by | body, Care for, Discover, Discuss, Ears, Find out, friendship, Get-in-touch, girl, Listen, mime, People, Self, Take part in, Think, Uncategorized, Understand | , , | Leave a comment

Lessons learned long ago are still there.

I have been checking out a link that I have from Facebook.  Heres my memory flash.:

I actually cannot remember what mine was.  1970’s are a bit long ago.  I do remember having to sew the darn thing onto my dark blue uniform sleeve.  Then finding out about a month later that I had sewn everything on in the mirror image.  I think thats when I learned to unpick my own sewing well.    Guess who had to sew everything back on the other way around.

Years later I got really hard to sew the badges down the sleeves, remove others as they had to be replaced when emblems took their place.  No wonder I enjoy informing the current guides that leaving the  badges on their sash (except patrol emblems) is a terrific idea. A personal history pathway that can lead to really great discussions with others who want to, are or have do a similar badge.

Yes I still sew things on in mirror image today.

April 28, 2010 Posted by | Care for, Feet, girl, Hands, Help, Learn, Uncategorized | , , | 1 Comment

Making ANZAC hats

The Guides  enjoyed making this slouch hat. Things did get a little hair raising but nothing a touch of the Glue gun could not fix.

Materials:

•  scrap felt

•  long gold bead to represent badge

•  needle and thread for stitching it together

•  leather strip for chin strap

•   narrow ribbon for brim.

Instructions:

1. Cut from felt—two crown pieces and one brim.

2. Stitch the two crown pieces together, using either back stitch or overcasting stitch, leaving the flat side open.

3. Turn the crown inside out (stitching inside).

4. Stitch brim to crown using either back stitch or overcasting stitch.

5. Turn up one side of hat to form slouch and sew the bead in the middle to hold in place.

6. Push crown down in middle.

7. Add leather strap underneath to form chin strap and ribbon for hatband.

Altered from ‘Aileen Anvey, a Guide Leader from  Queensland.

We found that on one camp the Guides enjoyed pinning this slouch hat to their camp hats. Another time small cork pieces were used for it to become a swaggy’s hat!  However when they tried to attach pieces of feathers we all learned new expletives.  The Glue was hot.  Eventually someone thought of using a pin to poke and direct the glue over the fluffy feather bits.  These hats really looked quite effective actually.

April 24, 2010 Posted by | ANZAC, Australian Icons, Challenge, Create, Create, Design, Design your own, girl, Hands, Illustrate | , , , , | 3 Comments

Were going to be at Churchill Festival 2010

Every two years Churchill has a festival.  Except for really bad weather the Hazelwood and Churchill Guides have attended this festival over the past twenty odd years that I know off.  There have been so many different things that the District Guides have done.  Each Festival is a different challenge. The same was apparent for this 2010 one as well.

This years festival was in some doubt re the continuance but local business have supported the organising committee.  unfortunately the dates changed.  So many organisations were thrown into disarray re their own appearance.    One such group was the Walker Street playground group.  Which the District leader met when the a presentation was put forward by the Walker Street Playground group at a Churchill District Community Development meeting [CDCA].

The District Leader made a suggestion that the Walker Street playground group conduct a survey of the youth of Churchill as to what they actually wanted to see happen to this land.  There were two challenges apparent.  The most pressing was the actual asking of the children. Not really an acceptable thing these days in Australia where a grown older man approaches the child.  So the District Leader suggested that the Guides of Hazelwood and Churchill do this as a service to their community.  Since the Churchill festival is approaching and the District was attending where there would be children we would make a simple survey and the Guides could ask the questions.  relief on the Walker Street playground mens faces was very apparent.

The Guides have been told of the rules and guidelines this service concept has been given. They are looking forward to the service.  How many friends and people out there do they know.

Over the last few months the Youth members have concentrated on the one hundred year Girl Guide celebrations. Working through different syllabus  aspects, combined with several other themes such as World Thinking day, the History of Guiding, the food and the Guides Four World Centers.  The last meeting we all went over which badges from the first term this year they have actually completed through the Guiding programs.  Some have realised that there were challenges outside of the meeting times.  These challenges count too.  But hay they are unable to receive, sew and wear these badges on the Churchill Festival day.

Not to worry the District leader has said wear no uniform.  No sash, shirt etc.  Dress to the occasion.  The Unit scarves will be supplied for the day.  Why?  When people approach others with a clip board the other person automatically feels vonerable and will put up defenses such as shyness, and an unwillingness to answer questions.  To overcome this no uniform is to be worn…just the scarf…. and a smile on their face and in their voice.

Designated boundaries are to be set.  he adult will be very near by within the specified area. This year our shelter will be the Kitchen fly.  Identifiable by the three flags that will be attached.  The area that the Guides may question the children in is from the front of the three flags.  If the adults at the base cannot see the Guides and their adult then they will be contacted via phone and the request will be made to come back to base. NOW.

Each small group of questioners will have a clip board and pen, a thank-you note which will have an invitation to the Guides Disco that they are planning on the 15th May 2010.  The age group the disco  invitations are aimed at are for the five to ten year olds. Primarily the females – who may bring their friends. The older target girls will be invited to another Disco for their age group when the older Guides begin an a Wednesday evening later in the term. Note we are not turning this age group down though!.

The idea for the Disco invitations came about as the Guides were wondering what the word promote Guiding meant.  Asked what made them realise that Guiding was not so scary most  answered that they had come to a Disco. One said she had promoted Guides through having a CD evening.  So disco was what we would have again this time as well as after the disco up by having a CD evening later this term.

There are other activities that both the Region, the District, the Leaders and then also the Youth are organising through out this years program.

While at the Churchill Festival, from the base shelter, simple painting crafts are on offer for painting.  Again an invitation will be included. The invitations are printed with a RSVP of the whynotgirlguides@gmail.com address and Susan’s – the District Leaders and Debbie’s a Unit Leader phone number.

April 15, 2010 Posted by | Activites, events and service, CDCA, District team, Friendship, girl, Girl-Power, hand, June, Kitchen Fly, Knowledge Basis, Knowledge management, Leadership-Skills, May, Multicultural Festival, Patrol System, People, Plan and Lead, Self, Service, talents, tent, Youth Members | , | 2 Comments