Ours2share's Blog

Hazelwood and Churchill (Victoria, Australia) local Girl Guide information noticeboard.

EMERGENCY EVACUATION of Hazelwood South Hall

EMERGENCY EVACUATION

The Hazelwood South Community Hall

· Fire

· Gas leak

· Bomb

A register will be maintained to enable accurate checks of those on site.

Emergency Assembly Plan for Hazelwood South Community Hall.

1. An emergency may be identified by anyone present.

2. Event Leader in Charge (LiC) is to be informed immediately.

3. LiC takes immediate steps to verify reported emergency and determines the severity (class of emergency) and responds accordingly.

Upon hearing the EMERGENCY ALTERT SIGNAL,

All present follow Emergency procedures as directed by LiC

At this signal

STOP What you are doing immediately.

LOOK To the Leader in Charge

LISTEN The LiC’s instructions

OBEY Carmly do as the LiC has told you…now.

GO To To the designated assembly area.

1. Event LiC or other designated person immediately picks up the attendance register and gathers participants at the designated Emergency Area.

2. Designated First Aider immediately takes First Aid Kit, checks all rooms and assists group members to the Assembly Area.

3. Any other leader or visiting personnel present immediately assembles with the group at the Assembly Area.

4. Event LiC calls a roll according to the attendance register to check that all members on site at the time are accounted for.

5. If a member of the group is unaccounted for at the roll call, the LiC will co-ordinate a search.

6. ALL OTHER PERSONNEL REMAIN AT ASSEMBLY AREA.

7. If required, the assembled group proceeds in an orderly speedy manner to the Emergency Evacuation Place as directed by Emergency Personnel.

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March 2, 2010 Posted by | Bomb, Emergency, Evacuation, Fire, First Aider, Gas, Gorilla, Hazelwood Honor Roll, Listen, Look, Obey, OHS, OOO, Procedure, Region leader, register, Stop | 1 Comment

Groundsheet

Next you will need a ground sheet made of any sort of waterproof material. You can buy ground sheets from a camping store, use heavy weight plastic or builder’s plastic or an old shower curtain. Your ground sheet will need to be about 2 metres x 1 metre, a little longer and wider than your sleeping bag when it is rolled out.
I found that having the builders plastic really makes crinkles and russling sounds at night. Also the builders plastic is ‘slippery’. The ground sheets that appear to be made of the matted plastic wear down slowly but you do not slip down wards so many times. As things should have at least two uses on camp have you considered how the ground sheet itself would be protected from ripping if you had to use it for an emergency shelter?
When you are sleeping, your ground sheet protects your sleeping bag and sleeping mat or air mattress from moisture and protect you from the cold. The warmth of your body draws the dampness up out of the ground and the underneath of the ground sheet will be quite wet in the morning even if the ground appeared dry when you laid the ground sheet down.
During the day your ground sheet will form the waterproof outer layer of your bedroll.

November 30, 2009 Posted by | bedroll, emergency-shelter, equipment, Groundsheet, protection | Leave a comment

Sleeping bags inner bag

My mum used to use these in the sixties when we went camping. You got it . She learned this trick from her mum. And relearned it when she was a Girl Guide just after the second world war. How did you guess. Yes her mum was a Girl Guide Leader too.

Linen inner sheet
A sheet inside your sleeping bag will add to your warmth and keep the inside of your sleeping bag clean. Sew an old flannelette sheet into a rectangular bag shape – leave the sides open near the top. A warmer, lighter sheet bag can be made from pure silk lining material. Buy double your length and stitch the sides.

November 30, 2009 Posted by | camp equipment Challenge, Explore, Outdoors, Rope, tent | Leave a comment

Sleeping bag

Firstly you will need a sleeping bag. There are basically two types of sleeping bags -ones filled with down or feathers and ones filled with synthetic material.
Down-filled ones are generally lighter, less bulky and warmer but they are mere expensive and harder to dry if they get wet.

Bags come in all sorts of shapes and thicknesses. Bags with a hood and drawstring around the neck will keep you warmer than those without. The warmest shape is called a “mummy” bag.
Choose a bag that has an insulated flap along the zip so that you don’t get cold along the zip line and one that can be unzipped from the inside and outside of the bag.

Most sleeping bags come with a cover or stuff bag. Down sleeping bags are simply ‘stuffed’, feet end first into this bag. Synthetic sleeping bags are generally rolled up and slipped into their cover. If you don’t have a cover for your sleeping bag you could make one or make a couple of strong bands of elastic to hold it together.

November 30, 2009 Posted by | bedroll, cold-factor, compact-packing, consider, equipment, protection, purchasing, sleeping-bag | Leave a comment

Stuck in as boat with choc biscuits and our Unit flag.

It was just too hot to do much. Having to run Guides inside was a horrible thought.  So the Guides found an area of shade under a big tree… in the dingy. As a get to know one another exercise they played in and around the dingy.  Cordial and chocolate biscuits were supplied and they went fast.  [In between the talking that is.]

Then out came the flags.  The first was the old Unit flag for when the Hazelwood Guides meet. Designed by the Guides.  Various Guides, parents and leaders created the flag. Probably why the colours are a pink background with light blue wide ribbon obtuse angles stripes and bright pink and lime green 4 to 5 cm circles sewn on both sides.

  These current Guides chose to recycle the flag and use it at all meetings were their ages were. it also meant that they did not have to make one too.  The empty  Flag pole from the Morwell Guide District,  which were donated to the Hazelwood and Churchill Guide District that week, were recycled too.  Now they hold this flag. Okay with that.

 Since the Guides are receptive to learning about flags, and the decision was theres various flag learning objectives struck  Strategies for learning and using this flag were implemented.  The Guides were also interested in learning about other flags, the protocol, ceremonies, care of flags, and of course what do you do with them?

November 14, 2009 Posted by | Care and storage, Challenge, Create, Flag ettiquate, Flags | Leave a comment

Sitapon

Ever think what your going to do with that tatty looking foam padding that used to be comfortable under your sleeping bag?

Is there an area that is about 30 cm square?  Good.  Having cut this to shape this will be your light weight camp sit-upon.

November 11, 2009 Posted by | consider, Create, equipment, Hands, Learn, Numbers, Outdoors, Recylcle, Scissors, Show, Sit-upon | Leave a comment

Not quite so sharp with a bit of padding


AIR MATTRESS OR PAD
You will be warmer and more comfortable in camp if you use a foam sleeping mat or pad or an air mattress. The foam pad is not quite as comfortable as an air mattress but will give you better insulation and hence greater warmth.
Air mattresses are bulky, heavy, need to be blown up and may puncture. If ycu use an air mattress, make sure your ground sheet is a little larger than it is so that the mattress will not get damp.

November 11, 2009 Posted by | camp, Discuss, equipment, Visit., Warmth-factor | Leave a comment

Woolly bag


Snug as a bug in a rug this piece of equipment is. Light weight to.
To keep super warm knit yourself a woolly bag. Use very fat needles – as fat as you can get and thin wool. Cast on about 60 stitches and knit loosely twice your length. Sew up the sides. Your bag should be very lacy – the more holes the better as it is.

November 11, 2009 Posted by | bedroll, cold-factor, compact-packing, consider, Create, equipment, knit, protection, purchasing, sleeping-bag, temp-regulation, woolly-bag | Leave a comment

Sleeping bags

The basic Sleeping bag

Firstly you will need a sleeping bag. There are basically two types of sleeping bags -ones filled with down or feathers and ones filled with synthetic material.
Down-filled ones are generally lighter, less bulky and warmer but they are mere expensive and harder to dry if they get wet.
Bags come in all sorts of shapes and thicknesses. Bags with a hood and drawstring around the neck will keep you warmer than those without. The warmest shape is called a “mummy” bag.
Choose a bag that has an insulated flap along the zip so that you don’t get cold along the zip line and one that can be unzipped from the inside and outside of the bag.
Most sleeping bags come with a cover or stuff bag. Down sleeping bags are simply ‘stuffed’, feet end first into this bag. Synthetic sleeping bags are generally rolled up and slipped into their cover. If you don’t have a cover for your sleeping bag you could make one or make a couple of strong bands of elastic to hold it together.

November 11, 2009 Posted by | bedroll, cold-factor, compact-packing, consider, equipment, Make and Use, protection, purchasing, sleeping-bag | Leave a comment

When planning on what to include in making a bedroll you will need a ground sheet made of any sort of waterproof material. You can buy ground sheets from a camping store, use heavy weight plastic or builder’s plastic or an old shower curtain. Your ground sheet will need to be about 2 metres x 1 metre, a little longer and wider than your sleeping bag when it is rolled out.

I found that having the builders plastic really makes crinkles and russling sounds at night.  Also the builders plastic is ‘slippery’.  The ground sheets that appear to be made of the matted plastic wear down slowly but you do not slip down wards so many times.  As things should have at least two uses on camp have you considered how the ground sheet itself would be protected from ripping if you had to use it for an emergency shelter?
When you are sleeping, your ground sheet protects your sleeping bag and sleeping mat or air mattress from moisture and protect you from the cold. The warmth of your body draws the dampness up out of the ground and the underneath of the ground sheet will be quite wet in the morning even if the ground appeared dry when you laid the ground sheet down.

During the day your ground sheet will form the waterproof outer layer of your bedroll.

November 11, 2009 Posted by | bedroll, Care for, consider, Create, Demonstrate, Discuss, emergency-shelter, equipment, Groundsheet, Kit List, Learn, make, Outdoors, Practice, protection | Leave a comment