Ours2share's Blog

Hazelwood and Churchill (Victoria, Australia) local Girl Guide information noticeboard.

Guides find out about the ‘Hub’ in Churchill.

The Churchill Hub is a fairly new building on Philip parade, Churchill, Victoria,  Australia.  Their are many services run through this building.  What we found was that many people did not know that it was not only just a place to pay their Latrobe City Councils bills, or to drop off the children at the day care end, even to go to the classes run through the Churchill Neighborhood Center.

The Churchill Library is only a small library.  However the service is part of the Latrobe Valley library service.  So one card does four library services.  The Guides have found that there are books, videos and C.Ds that interest them .  As such there is space in which to read, or just spend time alone.

The Churchill Neighborhood center has various classes run at all sorts of times.

There are also facilities for a community kitchen group.

March 17, 2010 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Advocacy, Badges, Awards and more, Culinary Arts, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Gipps Guides, Governance, Leadership, Life skills gained, Programs, Stepping stones, Youth Members | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Creating a Patrol Corner

Part of the overhanging mobile

While the Guides are learning about Patrols they are practising their Leadership skills. Although not all the Guides make it every night so quite often the others fill them in. So far this is where they are at.

Ready Set go

This how we play Kim's game

The Guides are creating their Patrol corner.  Learning how governance works, participating in creating their identity, and imprinting this identity on what they do and who they are.

First off came the getting to know one another, then the taking responsibility for your actions and recently the making of the patrols.  Then the choosing of Patrol Leaders and Seconders.  Learning and practising the listening to your Patrol members was an important issue.

Last night some of  the younger Patrol of Guides had arrived on time. A challenge was given to them.  Did they want to make a patrol Corner. Then make a Patrol Corner. Ahh Delegation is wonderful.So they got to work out where the Patrol Corner was to be. This reward was a decision made by the Leaders in recognition of these Guides arriving on time.

Keeping this corner clean and tidy is a Patrol responsibility. House keeping skills came into practice. While some of the Guides rolled up the carpet, others swept and then vaccumed the Patrol corner.

What furniture was to go where. Were they going to have flags there, which flags and where the flags would go.  What about utilizing one of the notice boards that was already on the wall.   While working on all this what was the World Guide Flag, and which of the three identifying unit flags they would rally under as a Patrol.

The area chosen is the furtherest away from both sets of exit doors, the kitchen and the heater, but next to the storage cupboards.  There was an old two meter bench thing with cupboard they asked for help to move to the other side of the Patrol corner. This has two shelve in hight but three spaces in length.

Okay, they took stuff from the cupboards and placed some things on the shelves.  The middle one being a combined area of stuff.  When the Guides were going through the storage cupboards they realised that there was heaps of stuff there.  Asking what they could take out we advised caution on quantity of ‘stuff” going on the benches.  Realising that all they had to do was ask and the key would be provided to open the storage cupboard the wooden shelves have a minimal amount of items on them.  things lie some jig-saw puzzles, pens, crayons, scrap paper.  Even pencil sharpners were found.

As Patrols they have Patrol books that they can record what they are doing in it.  These Patrol Books they used later with a Kim’s game that was played. There was a ‘weekly record book’ book from a few years back that one guide saw but I think it was put back into the cupboard.  When the guides are ready they will probably recycle or make their own ‘weekly’ record  book.

The tables have chairs there and now a table cloth on top. A new purple plastic one that covers both.  May have to purchase another couple for when more tables are used there though. But this decision will be there to make and to fund raise for.

The animal mobile that was made last year which is still hanging above the two tables ,  The combined choice is to leave it there.

Then they found out that there was an unlocked two shelve, glass cabinet, high up on the wall. From memory some of the ordinments that previous Guides have purchased are now in there.  They are dolphins swimming , a koala on a branch, a girl on a purple chair.

Yes to the notice board.  No to what was already there. When what was to go on the notice board was worked out a strong personality was over riding the others.  This was worked out with a Patrol Leader from one and a Patrol Second from another Patrol holding up posters and signs.  Where to best place these was decided by the others win the Patrols standing by the furtherest away from the notice board.

The establishment of this Patrol corner has been important in the practice of governance and having a voice in your Patrols Identity.

March 16, 2010 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Advocacy, Badges, Awards and more, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Governance, Leadership, Life skills gained, Stepping stones, what do Guides Do?, Who and what are the Girl Guides, Youth Members | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

What do I get out of this?

Everything we do as a person is knowledge gained that can be used towards something else. These are called stepping stones or gaining of life skills.

Some things we set out to do (our goals) are directly put towards badges.  Other things in the weekly program you helped organise may still go towards badges but we may not be sure where they fit in.  Talk to others around you (include the leaders as they may just know something too!!!) and find out where others have used these challenges. Activities, events and Service things are often being planned from the District and above level too. getting involved in these events again widens your views on what can and is achieved.

Show your badge books to your friends and family they may have ideas too.  Your friends might even want to be invited to do something with you too.

Every time the challenges are used or done they take on more dimensions.  We develop what we do.  First by learning from someone else, making mistakes, redoing the challenge, improving on how things work, having the skill to use the equipment in a ‘funner’ way… or on why the thing did not work out.

Oranising ourselves, team members, the public and even our families and friends. Knowing what to take, the jobs and activities that go into making this an event to remember (and want to remember!)  Talking and communicating with each other is a good skill to always improve on. Having a voice (advacacy) as well as using the governance skills gained where you and your friends can represent yourselves as individuals, or as a group/ team.

Working through the evaluations, then the pre-programing for the next time the challenge is run is a built on experience. Knowing how the thing is meant to work, the program and then what actually does happen to make it work.

Next level of gaining the skill is doing the job as a full member of the team or by yourself.  This greatly depends on what the challenge is, the job is.  Once you have the hang of this then your next challenge is to show someone else how and what to do.  Let them have the fun of just doing something, being part of the team, making the mistakes, correcting them too, including  them in the next adventure.

Gaining a skill, then showing others how to do this skill, learning another skill and repeating the basic process  is part of skill gathering and may be even ‘maturing’ – not necessarily getting older either. Do we ever stop learning.  I hope not. But as we progress in  Guides there are different ways of  wearing badges.

Check out the lapel badges

Lapel badges not often seen

In the beginning of anyone’s Guiding experiences the gaining of badges may happen quickly.  Then they get a little harder.  There is going to be gaps to fill in now on different badge requirements.  So now you set out to fill in these gaps either by yourself, with family, friends, peers, other Guides (at Guides or not).

When badges are presented please remember that some Guides may have taken a long time to actually finish off a few which seem to be be given out at the same time.  This is just how things happen.  The impression is false if one thinks that someone is a ‘better’ Guide, or better at Guides than someone else because of the badges on a sash or a shirt.  This is not the case.  Take into consideration how many years has that person been in Guides, is her family involved, does she include other activities into her Guiding awards?  Does she choose not to wear her badges on her sash?  Was there a problem where the sash or shirt was destroyed (accident, fire) or lost (when moving, or put down on a train, at a camp?)   Simply is she not interested in awards, unable to afford the sash or badges?  Or is she busy finalizing a handful of others but has not finished them yet? May be she just wants to do one at a time and do that one well.

Encouraged to be written by Clear Vision

January 21, 2010 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Advocacy, Australian Guide Program, Badges, Awards and more, Challenge the World, Culinary Arts, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Gipps Guides, Governance, Leadership, Life skills gained, Programs, Region Guiding, Stepping stones, Survival methods, Uncategorized, what do Guides Do?, Who and what are the Girl Guides, World Guiding, Youth Members | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

What do you need to do before you come down to Australia Day

  • Full Uniform (as much as possible until the uniform change has occurred)  Blue polo shirts are available at Big W, Target, Kmart for about $ 4 to $ 5 at this time of year.  They will do until the new shirts are available from Guide Shop).
  • Are all the badges sewn onto the sash?
  • Have breakfast.
  • Take a drink bottle with cold water inside it.
  • Sunscreen yourself.
  • Have you checked on your own presentation?
  • Fill out the activity paperwork and have parent sign as you arrive.  Look for a leader.

January 21, 2010 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Australian Guide Program, Badges, Awards and more, District team, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Gipps Guides, Hazelwood and Churchill, Leadership, Life skills gained, Programs, Stepping stones, Survival methods, what do Guides Do?, Who and what are the Girl Guides, Youth Members | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Governance makes camp planning fun

Camping is fun.

Often when the proposal of going to camp comes up the newer in experience Guides groan.  What ever their age, or experience, most people have been to camps where they have little in put, they are kept out of much of the planning. However the preordained activities are great, they have a ball, the relatives or school mates all try to outdo each other.  But from these experiences what have they learned? What skills have they worked towards and gained? Are the rewards what the person really was striving for?  or was the experience ” …just like any another activity!….Boring!!!”

Right from the first suggestion of a camp Guides of all ages in the Hazelwood and Churchill Units have much in put – after all it’s their camp.  Therefore the  Guides are shown how to organise a plan of action, decide on their theme, the menus, activities and the pre-camp activities are included into the normal program. Some of the things that are on the to learn or add practice list are standard requirement that the Leaders have a need to know the Guides understand how to do and when to use. These activities  may consist of focusing on different types of cooking rules, learning how to clean inside things, choosing a sleeping bag to purchase or borrow, erect and strike tents, care for the tents, bush walk, tie knots for commando and skills training activities, make tracking activities, read maps, make bed rolls secure, camp gadgets, camp site planning, camp program, flag pole, Campfire, Guides Own, entrance, cooking facilities, water gathering methods…..

Often the decisions are influenced by those with greater camping skills.  Experienced leaders mentoring the newer Guides, Parents, helpers and Leaders.

Governance is very much the Guides method of management choice.  Each camp then has very have made very clear goals and Guides lines to be planned around.  Depending on the experience and age of the Guides going on camp the steps taken are worked out in a way which is both a challenge and achievable. How the Guides will go about getting help as they work towards gaining what they have set out to do is different ,but the same , on each camp.  Some may use the experience for the Look Wide Badges, others towards their Peak Achievement Awards.  There are other things that they may work towards as well.

If the theme is an international camp they may include that years Jota / Joti as either a pre or post activity.  The camp may have a morse code night activity or two. Or there may be a State or Region sleep over.

On the “Other People” camp each Guide chose a country to look into. The Units Patrols were asked to choose a Guide Region.  [Western Hemisphere, Asia Pacific, European, African, Arab Nations, Russian, the Americana’s]  Some looked at their heritage for a county, others chose a country from school subjects. Patrols then put their interest forward as to which country they would work with.

The Patrols then chose the menus from various recipes supplied, activities and games from different countries represented, the decorations were posters that the Guides created about ‘their’ country.

Other camps the focus may be on outside camping under canvas.  Is the camp site to be in a controlled bush setting [ with toilets provided? or as an expedition?  What shelter and equipment do they need to learn and experience before they go on camp.  Whose transporting everything?

When organising of the camp whose doing what job? How many patrols? Where is the money to pay for the camp coming from? Is it Unit restricted? Age restricted ? Open to all.?  What about the Big jamborees?  The Region Camps?

The biggest hurdle the Guides face is a panic attack.  Will they look stupid?  Do they know anything?  Initially a panic attach on exactly what do they have to learn.  When they realise they have done so much each time they have come to Guides that are cross credited as training the Guides are initially “surprised”.  Then excited and smiling.  fear of the unknown starts to be removed.  New Challenges step to the front. That is why, from the start, Guide camps are learning stepping-stones and challenges made into fun.

Writing encouraged by http://www.clear-vision.com.au

December 10, 2009 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Advocacy, Australian Guide Program, Badges, Awards and more, Culinary Arts, District team, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Gipps Guides, Governance, Hazelwood and Churchill, Leadership, Life skills gained, Programs, Region Guiding, Stepping stones, Survival methods, what do Guides Do?, Who and what are the Girl Guides, Youth Members | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Activities, events and service.

Girl Guides are always involved in something.  A lot of the time there is much preparation and little to show for it.  The thing is unless you have a clear vision and a known goal, the stepping-stones that are the break down of the strategies used may not be apparent.  Often one learning activity is a stepping stone from another learning activity.  Thus said there is always different levels of ability and interest within the Girl Guides involved.  Some Girl Guides may have obtained visible markers (badges) others are working towards these.  Some may nearly be finished one  (or more) of one badge type.  Where as others may be using those same experiences towards there badges.  it’s up to each Guide personally to choose where the challenge and the experience may be heading in her life.
Girl Guides are always doing something.  As parents, careers or the public we just may not be aware of it…..  Yet!  Yes the Guides are always thinking up something.
The Hazelwood and Churchill District team are there to support these activities through people power,  fundraising and amongst other things friendship.

November 29, 2009 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Advocacy, Australian Guide Program, Badges, Awards and more, Challenge the World, Culinary Arts, District team, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Gipps Guides, Governance, Hazelwood and Churchill, Leadership, Life skills gained, Programs, Region Guiding, Stepping stones, Survival methods, what do Guides Do?, Who and what are the Girl Guides, World Guiding, Youth Members | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Victorian Guiding events calender

We are currently waiting for 2010 events ,services, trainings and activities to be published

November 29, 2009 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Advocacy, Australian Guide Program, Badges, Awards and more, District team, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Gipps Guides, Governance, Hazelwood and Churchill, Leadership, Life skills gained, Region Guiding, Stepping stones, what do Guides Do?, Who and what are the Girl Guides, World Guiding, Youth Members | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Begining the Olave Baden-Powell award.

Having made their Guide Promise members of the Gipps Guides are choosing to begin their journey through the Olave Baden-Powell Award.

These 18 to 29 year olds are challenging themselves to that both their Guiding Promise and their Guiding into the wider community.

Quite often bringing back to those around them different lessons and influences that they have experienced. Often not realising just how much influence on other peoples lives, thoughts and interests that being involved with activities, events and programs which appeal to them can have.    Part of the Olave Award progress is to present what you have done to your peers.   If you are working in any youth organisation/ work place as a Leader/ teacher or Adult Carer your experiences will transfer to others.  When an event/activity/ service is described, it’s successes, and flops along the way, the struggles/ surprises and things that go right all combine to challenge others in how different to do their chosen things.

Setting out to do something is often a challenge rewarded and supported by others already travelling or who have travelled along that path too.  There are many friends you meet and make within this Olave Program.  people you may have met at school, work, camps or round the block even.

November 29, 2009 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Australian Guide Program, Badges, Awards and more, Challenge the World, Culinary Arts, District team, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Gipps Guides, Hazelwood and Churchill, Leadership, Life skills gained, Region Guiding, Stepping stones, Survival methods, what do Guides Do?, Who and what are the Girl Guides, World Guiding, Youth Members | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Flags are actually fun

Who ever thought that having a silly old flag flying was boring does not know what we do!

Things we have done and learned about flags

  • Flags can be incorporated into games and as part of other group activites ( marching, indentify with).
  • Chosen the colour of different meeting times flags
    • Churchill Guide Unit Flag (now the flag for the 5 to 8’s [Purple])
    • Hazelwood Guide Unit Flag  (now the flag for the 8 to the 13 Guides)
    • Churchill Guide Unit Flag (now the flag for the 13 to 17 Guides [ mid blue with light purple trim])
  • Erecting the flag pole
  • Hoisting the Flag,
  • Protection of Flag.
  • Why a flag. World Guide Song has our Guiding flag unfurling.
  • Carrying our Flag.
  • Ceremonial flag preperations.
  • Colour Party
  • Giving instructions.
  • Different games and challenges.
  • Different Cermonies attended’
  • Know and choose what flags the District has to use.
  • been introduced to other countries (Argentina, New Zealand, Kiribut)
  1. Melbourne Guide Parade through Elizabeth Street….for B.P and Queens Guide reciepents.
  2. Australian Day Celebrations at Morwell and Churchill
  3. A.N.Z.A.C. Day celebrations at Morwell and Yinnar.
  4. Victory in the Pacific (VP) 50th Birthday Celebrations.
  5. The return of the Hazelwood Roll of Honour to the Hazelwood South Hall.
  6. Camp Flags.
  7. Parade
  8. Presentations.
  9. Where the Units all meet together at District Functions.
  • .

November 29, 2009 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Badges, Awards and more, District team, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Gipps Guides, Leadership, Life skills gained, Stepping stones, what do Guides Do?, Who and what are the Girl Guides, Youth Members | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments