Ours2share's Blog

Hazelwood and Churchill (Victoria, Australia) local Girl Guide information noticeboard.

Family BBQ’s are just for fun

A few years ago the Units held Family get together’s.  This meant that the parents could meat and great each other.  Instead of being so and so’s mum or dad they met someone with a name!

These Family BBQ’s were quite successful for a while.  Being run once every two terms proved better than every term.  So in the middle of the first and third terms a night was chosen and things were arranged.

  • Advocacy, Governance and ownership by all levels of Guiding within this District.
  • No special agenda just good food and friendship.  Not a political evening. But a good way of quietly providing an avenue where parents and friends could be included and of assistance.
  • The Guides who could attend had an increase in their self confidence as their parents and families are important enough to be invited and come to a District function.  The mind set of having parents involved offered a protection around the guides attending.
  • The Guides attending quietly showcased their talents and skills learned through the night.
  • Risk annalysises were completed
  • Hostessed by the District Leader and the District team divided the work load.  Of course offers of help were taken up be they from Guides, the parents or family friends.
  • The District Team got together to divided the jobs.
  • Invites were sent out one month in advance.
  • The RSPA was two weeks before the date set.
  • Parents received reminder notices via face book and twitter as the evening approached..
  • Membership tended to increase as the public interest hightened.
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April 11, 2010 Posted by | Activites, events and service, August, BBQ, Belonging, Carry Out, Challenge, clean, cook, Create, Culinary, Demonstrate, Develop, Discuss, District team, Entertain, Enthusiasm, Explore, Extend, Family BBQ, Food, Friendship, Get-in-touch, Gipps Guides, guest, Hands, Hazelwood South Hall, Hostessing, identity, job Description, March, Objectives, Occupation Health and Safety, ownership, Pancake morning tea, Plan, PR, Practice, Prepare, protection, Protocol, recognition, response, risk, Risk Annalysis, Self-Confidence, Self-Esteem, Self-presentation, special, Take part in, talents, volunteer, Youth Members | | Leave a comment

Groundsheet

Next you will need a ground sheet made of any sort of waterproof material. You can buy ground sheets from a camping store, use heavy weight plastic or builder’s plastic or an old shower curtain. Your ground sheet will need to be about 2 metres x 1 metre, a little longer and wider than your sleeping bag when it is rolled out.
I found that having the builders plastic really makes crinkles and russling sounds at night. Also the builders plastic is ‘slippery’. The ground sheets that appear to be made of the matted plastic wear down slowly but you do not slip down wards so many times. As things should have at least two uses on camp have you considered how the ground sheet itself would be protected from ripping if you had to use it for an emergency shelter?
When you are sleeping, your ground sheet protects your sleeping bag and sleeping mat or air mattress from moisture and protect you from the cold. The warmth of your body draws the dampness up out of the ground and the underneath of the ground sheet will be quite wet in the morning even if the ground appeared dry when you laid the ground sheet down.
During the day your ground sheet will form the waterproof outer layer of your bedroll.

November 30, 2009 Posted by | bedroll, emergency-shelter, equipment, Groundsheet, protection | Leave a comment

Sleeping bag

Firstly you will need a sleeping bag. There are basically two types of sleeping bags -ones filled with down or feathers and ones filled with synthetic material.
Down-filled ones are generally lighter, less bulky and warmer but they are mere expensive and harder to dry if they get wet.

Bags come in all sorts of shapes and thicknesses. Bags with a hood and drawstring around the neck will keep you warmer than those without. The warmest shape is called a “mummy” bag.
Choose a bag that has an insulated flap along the zip so that you don’t get cold along the zip line and one that can be unzipped from the inside and outside of the bag.

Most sleeping bags come with a cover or stuff bag. Down sleeping bags are simply ‘stuffed’, feet end first into this bag. Synthetic sleeping bags are generally rolled up and slipped into their cover. If you don’t have a cover for your sleeping bag you could make one or make a couple of strong bands of elastic to hold it together.

November 30, 2009 Posted by | bedroll, cold-factor, compact-packing, consider, equipment, protection, purchasing, sleeping-bag | Leave a comment

Woolly bag


Snug as a bug in a rug this piece of equipment is. Light weight to.
To keep super warm knit yourself a woolly bag. Use very fat needles – as fat as you can get and thin wool. Cast on about 60 stitches and knit loosely twice your length. Sew up the sides. Your bag should be very lacy – the more holes the better as it is.

November 11, 2009 Posted by | bedroll, cold-factor, compact-packing, consider, Create, equipment, knit, protection, purchasing, sleeping-bag, temp-regulation, woolly-bag | Leave a comment

Sleeping bags

The basic Sleeping bag

Firstly you will need a sleeping bag. There are basically two types of sleeping bags -ones filled with down or feathers and ones filled with synthetic material.
Down-filled ones are generally lighter, less bulky and warmer but they are mere expensive and harder to dry if they get wet.
Bags come in all sorts of shapes and thicknesses. Bags with a hood and drawstring around the neck will keep you warmer than those without. The warmest shape is called a “mummy” bag.
Choose a bag that has an insulated flap along the zip so that you don’t get cold along the zip line and one that can be unzipped from the inside and outside of the bag.
Most sleeping bags come with a cover or stuff bag. Down sleeping bags are simply ‘stuffed’, feet end first into this bag. Synthetic sleeping bags are generally rolled up and slipped into their cover. If you don’t have a cover for your sleeping bag you could make one or make a couple of strong bands of elastic to hold it together.

November 11, 2009 Posted by | bedroll, cold-factor, compact-packing, consider, equipment, Make and Use, protection, purchasing, sleeping-bag | Leave a comment

When planning on what to include in making a bedroll you will need a ground sheet made of any sort of waterproof material. You can buy ground sheets from a camping store, use heavy weight plastic or builder’s plastic or an old shower curtain. Your ground sheet will need to be about 2 metres x 1 metre, a little longer and wider than your sleeping bag when it is rolled out.

I found that having the builders plastic really makes crinkles and russling sounds at night.  Also the builders plastic is ‘slippery’.  The ground sheets that appear to be made of the matted plastic wear down slowly but you do not slip down wards so many times.  As things should have at least two uses on camp have you considered how the ground sheet itself would be protected from ripping if you had to use it for an emergency shelter?
When you are sleeping, your ground sheet protects your sleeping bag and sleeping mat or air mattress from moisture and protect you from the cold. The warmth of your body draws the dampness up out of the ground and the underneath of the ground sheet will be quite wet in the morning even if the ground appeared dry when you laid the ground sheet down.

During the day your ground sheet will form the waterproof outer layer of your bedroll.

November 11, 2009 Posted by | bedroll, Care for, consider, Create, Demonstrate, Discuss, emergency-shelter, equipment, Groundsheet, Kit List, Learn, make, Outdoors, Practice, protection | Leave a comment

GROUND SHEET


Next you will need a ground sheet made of any sort of waterproof material. You can buy ground sheets from a camping store, use heavy weight plastic or builder’s plastic or an old shower curtain. Your ground sheet will need to be about 2 metres x 1 metre, a little longer and wider than your sleeping bag when it is rolled out.
I found that having the builders plastic really makes crinkles and russling sounds at night.  Also the builders plastic is ‘slippery’.  The ground sheets that appear to be made of the matted plastic wear down slowly but you do not slip down wards so many times.  As things should have at least two uses on camp have you considered how the ground sheet itself would be protected from ripping if you had to use it for an emergency shelter?
When you are sleeping, your ground sheet protects your sleeping bag and sleeping mat or air mattress from moisture and protect you from the cold. The warmth of your body draws the dampness up out of the ground and the underneath of the ground sheet will be quite wet in the morning even if the ground appeared dry when you laid the ground sheet down.
During the day your ground sheet will form the waterproof outer layer of your bedroll.

November 11, 2009 Posted by | bedroll, emergency-shelter, equipment, Kit List, protection | Leave a comment

The basic Sleeping bag


Firstly you will need a sleeping bag. There are basically two types of sleeping bags -ones filled with down or feathers and ones filled with synthetic material.
Down-filled ones are generally lighter, less bulky and warmer but they are mere expensive and harder to dry if they get wet.

Bags come in all sorts of shapes and thicknesses. Bags with a hood and drawstring around the neck will keep you warmer than those without. The warmest shape is called a “mummy” bag.
Choose a bag that has an insulated flap along the zip so that you don’t get cold along the zip line and one that can be unzipped from the inside and outside of the bag.

Most sleeping bags come with a cover or stuff bag. Down sleeping bags are simply ‘stuffed’, feet end first into this bag. Synthetic sleeping bags are generally rolled up and slipped into their cover. If you don’t have a cover for your sleeping bag you could make one or make a couple of strong bands of elastic to hold it together.

November 11, 2009 Posted by | bedroll, cold-factor, compact-packing, consider, equipment, protection, purchasing, sleeping-bag | Leave a comment