Ours2share's Blog

Hazelwood and Churchill (Victoria, Australia) local Girl Guide information noticeboard.

Preparing a camp fire

Choose a theme and sort out the camp fire program 

  • Learn the song selection [at least be familiar with.]
  • My favorite camp things
  • What about using the Yells, Chants, and camp fire games?

Know the campfire and flame safety rules.

Practice with marshmallows and candle.

Have activities in the dark.

Have alternatives for bad weather.

Make equipment to use at campfire

  • Notice board with emergency assembly area on display
  • Sign in / sign out book.
  • Campfire song book each member.
  • Making an entrance.
  • Marsh mellow sticks.
  • Water buckets.
  •  Camp Blanket.
  • Woodpile – graded.
  • Musical instruments
  • What about the campfire too?

Now just who is the target audience for this campfire.  Just the Guides as part of their program or a camp? Or the Unit or Adults such as the Gipps Guides too?  To be inclusive of friends and family? As a District event that is target to what audience.  The combination of the talents and skills learned by those preparing the campfire suggestions / evaluations made before, and who the target audience is strongly reflects the planning and management of the campfire.

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June 1, 2010 Posted by | August, Find out, Food, Fun, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Rac Wac 2008

Late 2007 saw the guides plan there own Rac Wac [Race around Churchill/ Wheel and Churchill.]   They planned the route together.  One Guide stated she would like to organise some of the other Guides to help her over the end of Year brake from school.

Early the next year the menu was finaised as the guides wanted a BBQ at the end of the Rac Wac.  Parents were organised to follow everyone around the desired route.  Which was altered for some reaason known to the Guides themselves.

Half way round one Patrol was sat down and they had to explain to the Leaders and the Gipps Guide, what an asthma management plan was, what they should do to lessen the chance of an attach brought on by a sudden wind change in the early evening and when they would have to be responsible to phone an ambulance.  What the number of the Emergency services was and what to tell then.  With this breather done they procceded to walk to the BBQ a[and toilet] area.

May 28, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lend a Hand

Brownie Camporee
Image by StarrGazr via Flickr

Lending a hand was the Motto for Brownie Guides. This being so we got the Brownies to trace around their own hand and then think of at least five things [ one per finger] that they could do to help some one over the  next week.

Gumnut Brownies learned to Care and Share, Brownie Guides were lending a Hand, Girl Guides Motto was to Be Prepared.  Ranger guides had the same Motto but their Guide Promise was extended in order that they take their Promise out into the Wider Community.  As you can see the Lend a Hand motto was preparing the Brownie Guides to join in with bigger and better service concepts and thus participate more in service planning that lead into positive  actions.

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May 28, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Before overnight stays, camps or expeditions leaders need to

The format for preparing, going, returning and evaluating overnight stays to expeditions is constant.  The value of being constant being that of repetition.  Everyone knows what you are in need of, will offer you help and be able to help you out / direct you where to find what you are looking for. The Guides and Parents also recognise the power of duplication.  They too become familiar with their procedures and pre-camp agendas.  Therefore when undergoing training as adults they are familiar with the standards set and are comfortable emulating this Duty of Care level needed.

  1. Have appropriate paper work completed sighted and signed off by District Leader.
  2. Leader in Charge needs to be qualified
  3. Parents need to be informed
  4. Guides need to be fully registered
  5. Guides need training too
  6. A pre-camp list for the Guides needs to be sorted out well in advance.
  7. Any Medical needs and processes known.
  8. Risk analysis to be done.
  9. Emergency evacuation procedures and assembly areas known and sited.
  10. Guides need input to the planning
  11. Attendance list needs to be up to date and current.
  12. Allergies to be known.
  13. First Aid kit checked and if necessary updated.
  14. Book site.
  15. Cleaning and maintenance to be done.
  16. Menu chosen.
  17. Program to include wide games, campfire, Guides Own, free time, outdoor activities, camp jobs, patrol activities depending on time available.
  18. Ongoing preperations for evaluations to be written.
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May 27, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Making informed decisions on how to do the Centenary Challenge badge

  1. The Leaders received the Youth members copies of the Centenary Challenge badge book.
  2. Discussion on how, when and where the badge syllabus may take the leaders and the District was held.  The Leaders were willing to support the Guides to revitalize their Guide meeting times knowing that when the Youth members are really enjoying themselves they and their happy parents bring in more families and prospective Guides.
  3. Also the information of all challenges was to be written onto ‘ours2share.wordpress.com’ in order to keep all parents, team, Leaders and Guides informed. Thus for filling part of the District Upgrade.
  4. The following meeting was with the Guide Youth members themselves.  So as part of the program each Guide was given their complimentary copy of the Centenary Challenge book.
  5. A discussion was held with the Guides. The Leaders were excited to hear what the Guides wanted to do.
  6. Firstly what was the Centenary Challenge badge.  How did this badge come around.
  7. Then the levels of the Centenary Challenge were explained to the Guides.
  8. The decision to complete the Centenary Challenge Badge by working through various colors until first level was completed was a novel way sorting out the Programing. The Guides wanted these colors completed during the Guide programs, events, service and activities.
  9. What color came first is another decision made by the Guides.  It was also understood that sometimes the progressive pattern may be muddled up but each of the first level sections and questions would be incorporated.
  10. How would the knowledge gained from the Centenary Challenge Badge be implemented into the Guiding program by the Guides themselves?
  11. Once earned the Guides would know that they had challenged themselves in different ways.

April 21, 2010 Posted by | 100 Years of Guiding, Self-Confidence, Self-Esteem | , , | 3 Comments

SWOT General for:Camping or overnight stays

Strengths

  • Years of experience of us
  • Trainings
  • Interests
  • Ability of adults
  • Knowing Guidelines (updates included)
  • Network.
  • Helpers and District Team assistance
  • Complementary learning
  • Leasers know know what’s in the training book
  • Qualifications : Guiding, First aid, food safety, After school coaching program.

Weakness

Lack of girls

Lack of other experienced leaders

  • Time to train other leaders
  • Lack of parental involvement
  • Parents lack of what’s expected of them (assistance, police check, working with Children)
  • Transport.
  • Finances
  • Dietary requirements
  • Opportunities
  • Public relations.
  • Support through ‘Networking’
  • Advertising-Word of mouth, posters, being seen out and about.
  • Increase of skills levels.
  • Recognition levels.

Threats

  • Seasonal illnesses and asthma.
  • Environment danger
  • Boredom and temper tantrums.
  • Other organisations.
  • Non-communication of what they want
  • Objectives and actions for all the District Outdoor activities
  • Increase mental stimulation
  • Encourage practical activities that fulfil the need for achievement and recognition.
  • Badge work, peer acceptance at school and guides,
  1. Achievement of badges
  • Expanding tunnel vision and sharing information.
  • Presentation night.
    • Charts and displays
    • badges
  1. Acceptance of change.
  2. Keeping the programs interesting
  • Back up systems
  • integrated learning and sharing
  1. Increase numbers in guide units.
  • Being seen participating in community activities / service.
  • Girl/ leader/ parent participation.
  • Public Relations being positive.
  • Advertising
    • In Newspaper with region.
    • Posters
    • Word of mouth
    • Radio

5. Training of leaders.

  • Active participation
  • Support network
  • Encourage trainee leaders to bring there personalties into guiding.

6. Encourage outdoor activities

  • follow up and included prelim training during program
  • Open to District these events
  • Included Gipps Guides and parents to participate.
  • Participate in Region and State activities

7. Record of events.

  • Photo evidence.
  • Journals

8. Finances

9. Transport

  • Car Shuffle

10. Adequate clothing for event.

11.Food preparation.

  • Food safety
  • Making sure that everyone to be fed and watered in group.

12. Job descriptions given.

13. Communication links to be function able.

14.       Occupational Health and Safety

Outcomes

  1. Increase mental stimulation
    1. Having calendar of all events from Unit to State.
    2. Girls in meetings programming their own calendar around their interests and known events, service and activities.
  • Encourage practical activities that fulfil the need for achievement and recognition.
    • Walk around Churchill planned and carried out.
      • Assisted by Unit Helper, Gipps Guides, trainee leader and Parents.
    1. Badge work, peer acceptance at school and guides.
  • 1 x bronze endeavour aimed for and achieved.
  • New girls realized that there were people there that they knew therefore – not so frightening being included.
    • Expanding tunnel vision and sharing information.
    • Having the Gipps Guides and parents involved on day builds up the self worth, service times and sharing of knowledge of all participants.
  1. Achievement of badges
  1. Qualifications and life skills knowledge is shared and passed on.
  • Remember that all active participants need food and drink. Especially when directly cooking and not getting fed.
  • Presentation night.
  1. Charts and displays.
    1. i.      Older ones used as training aids.
    2. ii.      Recognition of past peoples efforts in the creation of these charts.
    3. badges
    4. Back up systems
    5. Integrated learning and sharing
  1. Acceptance of change / transformation process .
  2. Keeping the programs interesting
  1. Increase numbers in Guide units.
  • Being seen participating in community activities / service.
  • Girl/ leader/ parent participation.
  • Public Relations being positive.
  • Advertising
  1. In Newspaper with region.
    1. i.      Churchill News will have an article on the Walk around Churchill- 19th Feb 2008.
    2. Posters.
      1. i.      Guides had posters up in schools and hall. They felt good.
      2. Word of mouth
        1. i.      Parent has asked to have updated A4 posters that have our Guides photos included so that the prep parents have something updated to send their girls to.  There is a conscious note by prep parents there is nothing advertised for preps to attend after school.
        2. ii.      2 x (10 yr olds) girls attended before Walk around Churchill activity.  One Girl on the day (7 year old).

5. Training of leaders.

  • Active participation
    • Walk around Churchill (preparation to evaluation, then next years one) organised by current trainee leaders,  unit helpers, Gipps Guides and Guides.
  • Support network
  • Encourage trainee leaders to bring there personalties into guiding.

6. Encourage outdoor activities

  • follow up and included prelim training during program
  • Open to District these events.
    • All levels participated.
    • Included Gipps Guides and parents to participate.
    • Participate in Region and State activities

7. Record of events.

  • Photo evidence.
    • Used Camera.
    • To be added to what the ‘Gipps Guides do’ CD.
    • Stored on Computers in hall and office.
    • Part of the history of activities re youth badges.
    • Journals

8. Finances

  • The expectation of ‘Free’.,
  • Donation from Business.
    • A selection of changeable protides letters for donations to be kept and used.
    • Copy of receipts kept in camp folder.

9. Transport

  • Car Shuffle
    • Licensed driver for car shuffle so that all cars arrived at departing time.
    • Parents who have access to a drivable car that they use regularly for their family actives need to realise that car pooling (by assumption) does not work. They need to get to activity by themselves.  Parents to read and note what’s on the Activity form.

10. Adequate clothing for event.

  • Hats and footwear still a concern.

11. Food preparation.

  • Food safety
    • Purchased just before the event and kept cool until used.
    • Food preparation certificates held by cooks.
    • Making sure that everyone to be fed and watered in group.
      • Note taken that all adults who participate are the first ones to be fed. Suggestion is that food for cooks and active adult participants is kept separately covered and warmed until participant is ready to consume in their rest period.
      • Have adequate fuel for stand by
      • Menu planned by Guides.
      • Overeager food orientated participants/adults are to be fielded away from the table holding/ cooking preparation areas.  Unless given a recognised job with a job description. This may be games coordinator rubbish removalist, Occ Health and Safety person etc.

12. Job descriptions

  • Adult assistances and parents not knowing where there assistance and skills boundaries lie. Job taken by one person then they are moved on by another.

13. Communication links to be function able.

14. Occupational health and safety.

  • Evaluation of Outdoor activities and events
  • Camping or overnight stays
  • Report s

April 7, 2010 Posted by | Action Plan, camp /overnightstays, Emergemcy | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Outcomes from the overnight stay [Food and Four World Centers]

  1. Governance practiced in situations where the Guides begin to understand their roles, how governance occurs, the implications of Governance
  2. Structuring the Guides in their own Patrols so that they are comfortable to allow Advocacy has occurred.
  3. What is a Patrol Activity is becoming clearer to the Guides.
  4. Leadership under different situations occurred.
  5. Recognition of each guides potential is being gained by the Guide herself, those Guides around her and the friends and family.
  6. Life skills are being recognised as needed, looked for and fulfilled to each Guides individual pace.
  7. Seeking out information skills has begun.
  8. Joining the library as members.
  9. Identity issues are still being worked on.
  10. Badges, and other rewards and recognitions for a job being attempted, roll being taken on , skill learned are appreciated.

March 18, 2010 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Advocacy, Badges, Awards and more, Culinary Arts, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Governance, Leadership, Life skills gained, Programs, Promise, Survival methods, Traditions, Uncategorized, Youth Members | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Overnight stay.

WHAT PARENTS NEED TO KNOW,,,,,,,,, THAT THE GUIDES HAVE PLANNED TO DO leading up to April 8/9th 2010..

  1. Over night stay  starts 1pm on the 8th and finishes 1pm on the 9th April 2010.
  2. The Hazelwood South Hall is at  790 Tramway Road, Churchill.
  3. Cost: $200.00 per participant.
  4. Theme: Food and Exploration of the Four World Centers.
  5. Participate in the pre-camp /over night activities where able in a District, Unit or Patrol Activity situation.
  6. Overnight stay colors organised.
  7. The overall Program is comleted.
  8. Sleeping accomadation:  Self standing tents …erected inside the Hazelwood South Hall. District owns these tents.
  9. Kit list  to be printed out for next week. Guides to get used to packing their own bag please.
  10. Each Guides own camp teddy not to be any bigger than the width of her hand.  Space on/in her kit bag is at a primium.
  11. Guides have worked out the duty rosters.
  12. Menu has been organised.
  13. First aid kit has been sorted out.
  14. Program been organised (yes) and is full of potential activities.
  15. Guides Promise to be made
  16. Older Patrol to meet at Churchill Shopping center for Quarter Master shopping list requirements.
  17. The Objectives of the Food and Four World Centers Overnight Stay.
  18. The Evaluation of the Food and Four World Centers Overnight stay.
  19. Evaluation of the Hazelwood South Hall
  20. The outcomes of the Food and Four World Centers overnight stay.

March 16, 2010 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Australian Guide Program, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Hazelwood and Churchill, Uncategorized, Youth Members | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Creating a Patrol Corner

Part of the overhanging mobile

While the Guides are learning about Patrols they are practising their Leadership skills. Although not all the Guides make it every night so quite often the others fill them in. So far this is where they are at.

Ready Set go

This how we play Kim's game

The Guides are creating their Patrol corner.  Learning how governance works, participating in creating their identity, and imprinting this identity on what they do and who they are.

First off came the getting to know one another, then the taking responsibility for your actions and recently the making of the patrols.  Then the choosing of Patrol Leaders and Seconders.  Learning and practising the listening to your Patrol members was an important issue.

Last night some of  the younger Patrol of Guides had arrived on time. A challenge was given to them.  Did they want to make a patrol Corner. Then make a Patrol Corner. Ahh Delegation is wonderful.So they got to work out where the Patrol Corner was to be. This reward was a decision made by the Leaders in recognition of these Guides arriving on time.

Keeping this corner clean and tidy is a Patrol responsibility. House keeping skills came into practice. While some of the Guides rolled up the carpet, others swept and then vaccumed the Patrol corner.

What furniture was to go where. Were they going to have flags there, which flags and where the flags would go.  What about utilizing one of the notice boards that was already on the wall.   While working on all this what was the World Guide Flag, and which of the three identifying unit flags they would rally under as a Patrol.

The area chosen is the furtherest away from both sets of exit doors, the kitchen and the heater, but next to the storage cupboards.  There was an old two meter bench thing with cupboard they asked for help to move to the other side of the Patrol corner. This has two shelve in hight but three spaces in length.

Okay, they took stuff from the cupboards and placed some things on the shelves.  The middle one being a combined area of stuff.  When the Guides were going through the storage cupboards they realised that there was heaps of stuff there.  Asking what they could take out we advised caution on quantity of ‘stuff” going on the benches.  Realising that all they had to do was ask and the key would be provided to open the storage cupboard the wooden shelves have a minimal amount of items on them.  things lie some jig-saw puzzles, pens, crayons, scrap paper.  Even pencil sharpners were found.

As Patrols they have Patrol books that they can record what they are doing in it.  These Patrol Books they used later with a Kim’s game that was played. There was a ‘weekly record book’ book from a few years back that one guide saw but I think it was put back into the cupboard.  When the guides are ready they will probably recycle or make their own ‘weekly’ record  book.

The tables have chairs there and now a table cloth on top. A new purple plastic one that covers both.  May have to purchase another couple for when more tables are used there though. But this decision will be there to make and to fund raise for.

The animal mobile that was made last year which is still hanging above the two tables ,  The combined choice is to leave it there.

Then they found out that there was an unlocked two shelve, glass cabinet, high up on the wall. From memory some of the ordinments that previous Guides have purchased are now in there.  They are dolphins swimming , a koala on a branch, a girl on a purple chair.

Yes to the notice board.  No to what was already there. When what was to go on the notice board was worked out a strong personality was over riding the others.  This was worked out with a Patrol Leader from one and a Patrol Second from another Patrol holding up posters and signs.  Where to best place these was decided by the others win the Patrols standing by the furtherest away from the notice board.

The establishment of this Patrol corner has been important in the practice of governance and having a voice in your Patrols Identity.

March 16, 2010 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Advocacy, Badges, Awards and more, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Governance, Leadership, Life skills gained, Stepping stones, what do Guides Do?, Who and what are the Girl Guides, Youth Members | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

What do I get out of this?

Everything we do as a person is knowledge gained that can be used towards something else. These are called stepping stones or gaining of life skills.

Some things we set out to do (our goals) are directly put towards badges.  Other things in the weekly program you helped organise may still go towards badges but we may not be sure where they fit in.  Talk to others around you (include the leaders as they may just know something too!!!) and find out where others have used these challenges. Activities, events and Service things are often being planned from the District and above level too. getting involved in these events again widens your views on what can and is achieved.

Show your badge books to your friends and family they may have ideas too.  Your friends might even want to be invited to do something with you too.

Every time the challenges are used or done they take on more dimensions.  We develop what we do.  First by learning from someone else, making mistakes, redoing the challenge, improving on how things work, having the skill to use the equipment in a ‘funner’ way… or on why the thing did not work out.

Oranising ourselves, team members, the public and even our families and friends. Knowing what to take, the jobs and activities that go into making this an event to remember (and want to remember!)  Talking and communicating with each other is a good skill to always improve on. Having a voice (advacacy) as well as using the governance skills gained where you and your friends can represent yourselves as individuals, or as a group/ team.

Working through the evaluations, then the pre-programing for the next time the challenge is run is a built on experience. Knowing how the thing is meant to work, the program and then what actually does happen to make it work.

Next level of gaining the skill is doing the job as a full member of the team or by yourself.  This greatly depends on what the challenge is, the job is.  Once you have the hang of this then your next challenge is to show someone else how and what to do.  Let them have the fun of just doing something, being part of the team, making the mistakes, correcting them too, including  them in the next adventure.

Gaining a skill, then showing others how to do this skill, learning another skill and repeating the basic process  is part of skill gathering and may be even ‘maturing’ – not necessarily getting older either. Do we ever stop learning.  I hope not. But as we progress in  Guides there are different ways of  wearing badges.

Check out the lapel badges

Lapel badges not often seen

In the beginning of anyone’s Guiding experiences the gaining of badges may happen quickly.  Then they get a little harder.  There is going to be gaps to fill in now on different badge requirements.  So now you set out to fill in these gaps either by yourself, with family, friends, peers, other Guides (at Guides or not).

When badges are presented please remember that some Guides may have taken a long time to actually finish off a few which seem to be be given out at the same time.  This is just how things happen.  The impression is false if one thinks that someone is a ‘better’ Guide, or better at Guides than someone else because of the badges on a sash or a shirt.  This is not the case.  Take into consideration how many years has that person been in Guides, is her family involved, does she include other activities into her Guiding awards?  Does she choose not to wear her badges on her sash?  Was there a problem where the sash or shirt was destroyed (accident, fire) or lost (when moving, or put down on a train, at a camp?)   Simply is she not interested in awards, unable to afford the sash or badges?  Or is she busy finalizing a handful of others but has not finished them yet? May be she just wants to do one at a time and do that one well.

Encouraged to be written by Clear Vision

January 21, 2010 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Advocacy, Australian Guide Program, Badges, Awards and more, Challenge the World, Culinary Arts, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Gipps Guides, Governance, Leadership, Life skills gained, Programs, Region Guiding, Stepping stones, Survival methods, Uncategorized, what do Guides Do?, Who and what are the Girl Guides, World Guiding, Youth Members | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments