Ours2share's Blog

Hazelwood and Churchill (Victoria, Australia) local Girl Guide information noticeboard.

Whistle signals

To have learned  and practised the whistle signals properly takes time.  By yourself these signals can be memorised and yes practised.  But that’s on sided learning in that there is no input from others.

Learing the whistle signals as a patrol activity makes this an interesting and memorable activity. The practical side is that emergency response signals [hand or Whistle] for the meeting area are then introduced. The procedures for both the Hazelwood South Hall and the Glendonald Child and Maternal Health Center are also current in the Patrols head.

  1. The Patrols choose their own special signal.
  2. Leader uses scatter signal to send patrols searching for tokens hidden round playing area.
  3. If one is found, finder stands still until PL notices, signals patrol to assemble before patrol collects token.
  4. Whenever leader signals “rally”, first patrol back earns extra token; last patrol forfeits one.
  • Vary with “PL come here”; deduct a token from patrols of any girls who mistake that signal for “rally”.

The giving of gifts and taking away of gifts is meant to build up patrol enjoyment and act as a stimulant to patrol team pirit.

The orginial ideas for this activity came from a Mc Evory, M. Program Compendium : a life line for leaders in Brownie Guide

and Guide sections. Girl Guide Association of Victoria 1985  What was not put in the instructions was that each Guide had to have their own personal whistle [hygiene reasons] and that this is a good one to practice somewhere other than indoors!

Other variations are the learning of an emergency signal or two.

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May 9, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

The overnight stay outcomes

Over the last few terms the Guides have been promised an over night stay.  These are the outcomes.

  • More overnight stays planned.
  • Skills upgraded.
  • Discovering the Four World Centers
  • Cooking knowledge and skills increased .
  • Exploration of International countries and some cultures.
  • Self development acknowledged
  • Still negatively geared re financial pathway
  • Made and used crafts, tools and teaching aids,
  • Promise and law explored.
  • Leadership skills obtained.
  • Patrols worked on.
  • Badges gained and progressed through.
  • Working on membership increase.
  • Life skills gained.
  • Hazelwood South Hall reused.
  • Guide traditions and Links of Unity explored.
  • Friendship bonds strengthened.

April 9, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Governance makes camp planning fun

Camping is fun.

Often when the proposal of going to camp comes up the newer in experience Guides groan.  What ever their age, or experience, most people have been to camps where they have little in put, they are kept out of much of the planning. However the preordained activities are great, they have a ball, the relatives or school mates all try to outdo each other.  But from these experiences what have they learned? What skills have they worked towards and gained? Are the rewards what the person really was striving for?  or was the experience ” …just like any another activity!….Boring!!!”

Right from the first suggestion of a camp Guides of all ages in the Hazelwood and Churchill Units have much in put – after all it’s their camp.  Therefore the  Guides are shown how to organise a plan of action, decide on their theme, the menus, activities and the pre-camp activities are included into the normal program. Some of the things that are on the to learn or add practice list are standard requirement that the Leaders have a need to know the Guides understand how to do and when to use. These activities  may consist of focusing on different types of cooking rules, learning how to clean inside things, choosing a sleeping bag to purchase or borrow, erect and strike tents, care for the tents, bush walk, tie knots for commando and skills training activities, make tracking activities, read maps, make bed rolls secure, camp gadgets, camp site planning, camp program, flag pole, Campfire, Guides Own, entrance, cooking facilities, water gathering methods…..

Often the decisions are influenced by those with greater camping skills.  Experienced leaders mentoring the newer Guides, Parents, helpers and Leaders.

Governance is very much the Guides method of management choice.  Each camp then has very have made very clear goals and Guides lines to be planned around.  Depending on the experience and age of the Guides going on camp the steps taken are worked out in a way which is both a challenge and achievable. How the Guides will go about getting help as they work towards gaining what they have set out to do is different ,but the same , on each camp.  Some may use the experience for the Look Wide Badges, others towards their Peak Achievement Awards.  There are other things that they may work towards as well.

If the theme is an international camp they may include that years Jota / Joti as either a pre or post activity.  The camp may have a morse code night activity or two. Or there may be a State or Region sleep over.

On the “Other People” camp each Guide chose a country to look into. The Units Patrols were asked to choose a Guide Region.  [Western Hemisphere, Asia Pacific, European, African, Arab Nations, Russian, the Americana’s]  Some looked at their heritage for a county, others chose a country from school subjects. Patrols then put their interest forward as to which country they would work with.

The Patrols then chose the menus from various recipes supplied, activities and games from different countries represented, the decorations were posters that the Guides created about ‘their’ country.

Other camps the focus may be on outside camping under canvas.  Is the camp site to be in a controlled bush setting [ with toilets provided? or as an expedition?  What shelter and equipment do they need to learn and experience before they go on camp.  Whose transporting everything?

When organising of the camp whose doing what job? How many patrols? Where is the money to pay for the camp coming from? Is it Unit restricted? Age restricted ? Open to all.?  What about the Big jamborees?  The Region Camps?

The biggest hurdle the Guides face is a panic attack.  Will they look stupid?  Do they know anything?  Initially a panic attach on exactly what do they have to learn.  When they realise they have done so much each time they have come to Guides that are cross credited as training the Guides are initially “surprised”.  Then excited and smiling.  fear of the unknown starts to be removed.  New Challenges step to the front. That is why, from the start, Guide camps are learning stepping-stones and challenges made into fun.

Writing encouraged by http://www.clear-vision.com.au

December 10, 2009 Posted by | Activites, events and service, Advocacy, Australian Guide Program, Badges, Awards and more, Culinary Arts, District team, Elements of Guiding Program, Fundamentals of Guiding Program, Gipps Guides, Governance, Hazelwood and Churchill, Leadership, Life skills gained, Programs, Region Guiding, Stepping stones, Survival methods, what do Guides Do?, Who and what are the Girl Guides, Youth Members | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment